Greek Mathematics – Pythagoras

Pythagoras is a well-known mathematician, most famous for his concept of geometry and is mainly remembered for what has become known as Pythagoras’ Theorem. It is believed that Pythagoras was the first to establish that “the sum of the angles of a triangle is equal to two right angles and that for a right-angled triangle the square on the hypotenuse is equal to the sum of the squares on the other two sides” – Famous People, 2017. Written as an equation: a2 + b2 = c2 and shown in the diagram below:

pythagoras

It is said that majority of the theorems ascribed to Pythagoras were in fact solved by his followers, Pythagoreans and was also carried on by his followers. This formula does not just apply to triangles, think again. The Pythagoras’ Theorem can be used with any shape and for any formula that squares a number (Mastin, 2010). For instance, if we use the same formula of the Pythagoras’ Theorem but change the shapes to, circles:

 

We can multiply the Pythagorean Theorem by our area factor and come up with a relationship for any shape. The actual line section itself can be any portion of the shape. You could choose the circle’s radius, diameter, or circumference and it would give a different area, but the formula 3-4-5 would remain the same. The Pythagorean theorem can help relate the areas of any similar shapes, I can see this sort of algorithm applied in the classroom (Azad, 2008).

 

Discuss with me, do you think the Pythagorean Theorem worth implementing in the classroom?

 

References

Azad, K (2008). Surprising Uses of the Pythagorean Theorem. Retrieved from https://betterexplained.com/articles/surprising-uses-of-the-pythagorean-theorem/

Mastin, L (2010). The Story of Mathematics. Retrieved from http://www.storyofmathematics.com/story.html

The Famous People (2017). Pythagoras Bibliography. Retrieved from http://www.thefamouspeople.com/profiles/pythagoras-504.php

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